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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >>> good evening. i'm scott shaffer. welcome to this week in northern california. we'll hear from elect eric cal sw -- swalwell. michael montgomery, reporter for kqed and center for investigative reporting, and moore, professor of law. the u.s. supreme court convened today behind closed doors discussing whether or not to review a lower court ruling striking down california's proposition 8. their highly anticipated decision could come monday. as you well know, the supreme court gets seven to eight thousand requests for cases to be reviewed. how do they decide? they only pick 80 or so a year. what is the criteria and why would prop 8 be an important one to look at? >> it's how legal the precedent is and how national the question is, how many people it affects, and relatedly, how much lower courts are struggling over that and related questions. so in the prop 8 case, it's true the prop 8 is a california-specific measure, and it's also true that a ninth circuit ruling tried to make its ruling non-specific. california is such an important state and it occurs in dozens of other states and tha
in northern california." big news today from the u.s. supreme court on gay marriage. before we get to our other topics, we'll briefly discuss that with our panelists. joining me tonight are jill tucker, "san francisco chronicle" education reporter. matthai kuruvila, also with the "san francisco chronicle." and paul rogers with "san jose mercury news." the high court announced it will review proposition 8, california's ban on same-sex marriage and the federal defense of marriage act. paul, we'll begin with you. what can we infer from this? what's the time frame? can we expect any sweeping judgments? >> well, a timeframe is the arguments are going to happen in march then we expect a decision by the end of the court session which is june 27th. it will probably go right to the very end. as for how sweeping and how big of a decision we can expect, that's sort of the $64,000 question that court watchers were already speculating about today. are we going to get a narrow ruling one way or another on either one of these two cases or is it going to be one of those once in a generation social civil
>>> good evening. welcome to "this week in northern california." i'm uyl quan. tonight, our thoughts and prayers are with the families affected by the school shooting in newtown, connecticut. now, to help those of you who would like to talk about the incident with your children, we provided a link to some useful resources on our website. we hope it can be of some help today in the wake of this devastating tragedy. we move now to tonight's discussion. and joining me on the panel are aarti kohli, senior fellow at uc berkeley's warren institute on war and social policy. paul rogers, environmental writer with the "san jose mercury news." stephen sock, investigative reporter with nbc bay area. and from los angeles, david lazarus, columnist with "the l.a. times." aurti, let's start with you. uc berkeley announced a new scholarship program for undocumented students. why did the university feel it was necessary to support these students? >> well, yes it's very excites news. $1 million from the foundation. and the university really feels strong obligation to these students because th
. there was huge victories for democrats in california house races, two supposedly embattled democrats in northern california held on, john garamendi and jerry mcnerdy. om omnivera unseated dan lundgren in his second bite at that apple. in an interesting example of how the top two primary system is going to change things going forward in california, we said good-bye to the dean of our congressional delegation, dean stark, as he was unseated by a fellow democrat, representative-elect herb swolo. >> i want to ask you you about the ethnic shift you mentioned. seemed to me the last 30 or 40 years, the republican has had a reliable model, the southern strategy, where you have to win roughly 60% of the white vote, mostly older, appealing to, you know, certain issues, gun control, abortion issues, things like that. but as the percentage of the vote has changed, going from, you know, 90% was white in 1980 that voted for president and now it was 72%, is there any way for the republicans to continue using that strategy going forward, or are they going to have to literally start from scratch because there ar
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)